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200 trees to be planted in cities affected by low air quality: “The benefits of trees go on and on and how amazing they are” – LocalNews8.com


By Jasmine Arenas

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DENVER (KCNC) – With Earth Day approaching, organizations in Denver want to continue supporting the push for cleaner air.

Denver’s “Anita Needs a Tree” campaign and Groundwork Denver are working to plant 200 trees in Commerce City and Sheridan from April 19 to May 4.

Those trees will be planted for families in cities where their health may be affected by the area’s heat and poor air quality.

Work began on Friday to loosen the soil for tree planting in the Sheridan neighborhoods.

Aracely Navarro is director of climate justice at Groundwork Denver, an organization on a mission to build a healthy and sustainable environment.

“Our mission is to provide low-cost trees and services to homeowners and low-income communities,” Navarro said.

It’s work that is needed in communities in Sheridan and Commerce City.

“This is important work for me personally because I care about our Black and Brown communities, which are overwhelmingly low-income communities,” Navarro said.

According to Melissa Englund, sustainability coordinator for the city of Sheridan, the city suffers greatly from low air quality, which causes a lot of air pollution.

“We have three highways and a lot of high-end industry,” Englund said.

The organization wants to plant its seeds in communities where the lack of trees is noticeable.

“Black and brown people tend to have no trees, often have no green space, and live in polluted areas,” Navarro said.

For homeowners like Alexia Cortez and Allison Belsterling, receiving trees from the organization helped them save hundreds of dollars and create a healthier environment.

“You can see the difference in the air when you are around so many trees, so it does help with the environment and in absorbing the carbon monoxide we emit from our cars, it is very important to take the time sting, even if It will take ten years and it will benefit us in the long run,” said Cortez.

The work that will continue to improve the oxygen and air that people breathe.

“The benefits of trees go on and on and how amazing they are,” says Navarro.

Homeowners were concerned about the snow coming in over the weekend, but volunteers told them not to worry.

The Hackberry tree can adapt to Colorado weather.

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